Richie Incognito believed to be in ‘altered, paranoid state’ by police officers

NFL


Former NFL offensive lineman Richie Incognito thought he was under surveillance by government officials when he was taken by police officers — who believed him to be in an “altered, paranoid state,” according to an incident report — for an involuntary psychiatric evaluation Wednesday in Boca Raton, Florida.

According to an incident report by the Boca Raton Police Department, obtained Thursday by ESPN, the 34-year-old Incognito “believed ordinary citizens were government officials that were tracking and recording him.” He was not arrested but was taken into custody under Florida’s Baker Act, which allows for involuntary psychiatric commitment for people seen as a danger to themselves or others.

Police were called when an apparently agitated Incognito allegedly threw tennis balls and other items at a Lifetime Fitness Center patron and employees, “skimmed” the patron’s leg with a weighted sled and threw weights at the patron and into the swimming pool.

When officers approached him, Incognito told them he was “running NSA class level 3 documents through my phone” and didn’t have to explain himself to officers because they didn’t have enough clearance, according to the incident report. When later told by officers that his behavior might pose a danger to others, Incognito asked a woman in the swimming pool to call the FBI.

According to the officers, Incognito also said he had taken an over-the-counter supplement called “Shroom Tech” and that his hands were shaking heavily, he had erratic speech and he “would suddenly jump up and move locations without warning.”

According to the incident report, officers didn’t believe Incognito had no intent to harm anyone but that “without care or treatment, there was a substantial likelihood Incognito would cause serious bodily harm to himself or others as evidenced by recent behavior.”

Because of Incognito’s “muscular frame,” officers said they used two sets of handcuffs linked together and double locked them.

Incognito announced this year that he was retiring after 11 seasons in the NFL, the last three with the Buffalo Bills. The Bills released him from their reserved/retired list Monday, leaving open the possibility he could sign with another team.

The four-time Pro Bowl selection has had a series of troubles. Incognito was among the players identified for targeting teammate Jonathan Martin in the Miami Dolphins‘ bullying scandal during the 2013 season. The NFL suspended Incognito for the final half of that season, and he was eventually released by Miami before being reinstated by the league the following offseason.

Incognito was out of football for 18 months before the Bills signed him to a one-year contract. Incognito told The Buffalo News that he made the decision to retire for health-related reasons, saying, “My liver and kidneys are shutting down. The stress is killing me.”

The retirement came after Incognito and the Bills agreed to a renegotiated contract in March that included a $1.7 million pay cut in 2018, which would have been the last year of his contract. Days before retiring in April, Incognito fired his agent, David Dunn, in a tweet.

At the time of his retirement, Incognito remained under investigation by the NFL for an allegation made by Jacksonville Jaguars defensive lineman Yannick Ngakoue that Incognito used racial slurs during the Bills’ AFC wild-card playoff loss to the Jaguars in January.

ESPN’s Mike Rodak and The Associated Press contributed to this report.



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